Poetry and Scotch go particularly well together. The lyrical rhythms and cadence of poetry and song are particularly suited to the swirling repetitive notes and flavours found in whisky.
Whisky has a foundation, a ground – as does Piobaireachd (a very old style of pipe tune) it repeats and changes as you nose it. It takes you on a journey with twists and turns as you delve deeper into its layers and structure. There is a magical space in poetry between the meanings of the words and sentences where the actual body of the poem lives – this is the same with whisky – you smell the notes and taste the flavours, experience the textures, but, the whisky is more than the sum of these parts – also, after drinking a few drams we, ourselves, tend to wax lyrical….

The Water of Life
the spirit has been stilled for long enough
the popping of the cork is followed by
a rising breath which hangs, then dissipates
perhaps all dreams are based upon such stuff

the popping of the cork is followed by
a rush of gold for fools, an ancient salve
perhaps all dreams are based upon such stuff
outdated wisdom and enchantery

no rush for gold of fools, this ancient salve
but something which can fire the modern mind
an older wisdom and enchantery
empowers the soul, releases our true selves

but something which can fire the modern mind
a rising breath which hangs, then dissipates
empowers the soul, releases our true selves
this spirit has been stilled for long enough

Enjoy this poem by Islay girl Elizabeth Angus whilst drinking one of your favourite malts.